Skip to content

News Digest: 7 August 2013

We’ve searched the web for interesting articles, news, resources and tools – so you don’t have to. Below are today’s featured News Digest posts:

  • Claiming their rightful place at the table
  • Autism Risk-Factors Database Could Aid in Epidemiological Studies of the Disorder
  • Brain Molecule Regulating Human Emotion, Mood Uncovered
  • Mindfulness Meditation Can Reduce Tobacco Cravings
  • Depression in older adults: What does it look like?

Read more

Basics of Chronic Pain: Definition and Statistics

Chronic pain affects approximately 30 percent of Americans, which means that at any given time nearly three out of ten people are suffering in some way. According to the Institute of Medicine, there are about 116 million Americans living with chronic pain. The Mayday Fund estimate of 70 million Americans with chronic pain is slightly more conservative. In an internet study, the prevalence of chronic pain in the United States was calculated to be 30.7% of the population: 34.3% for women and 26.7% for men. These estimates are in reasonable agreement and indicate a prevalence of chronic pain in the US that is relatively comparable to that of other countries (Wikipedia).

When we add the emotional, physical, and financial challenges of the people who care for them, the percentage of lives touched by chronic pain is much higher. To get a handle on this concept, let’s look at the definition of “chronic pain”, and what some of the salient statistics about it are.

Read more

What is Positive Psychology?

Positive Psychology’s primary focus is on what people do right to obtain and maintain optimum happiness (Compton, 2005), by striving to understand and help people develop qualities that lead to greater personal fulfillment. The premise of positive psychology is to promote factors that allow individuals to thrive and flourish by encouraging a change of focus in psychology from a preoccupation with repairing the worst things to a greater emphasis on discovering and building upon positive qualities.

Read more

News Digest: 19 June 2013

We’ve searched the web for interesting articles, news, resources and tools – so you don’t have to. Below are today’s featured News Digest posts:

  • ACA launches six-webinar series on the DSM-5
  • Bullying Among Siblings — Not as Harmless as We Think
  • IQ Link to Baby’s Weight Gain in First Month
  • Infections Linked to Mood Disorders Like Depression, Bipolar?
  • Reality TV as therapy

Read more

What is Group Therapy?

Group therapy is a popular mode of therapy for both therapists and clients. Group therapy is a highly effective form of psychotherapy that is based on interdependence and interaction among the group members who mutually disclose personal material (Lasky & Riva, 2006). Group psychotherapy began in the late 1800′s/early 1900′s when Joseph Pratt, a Boston physician, recognized the positive effects on tuberculosis patients who did not have access to sanatoria (Laski & Riva, 2006). Because their recovery required strict hygienic regimens in their impoverished homes, he used regular group meetings to educate his patients on how to combat the diseases. Other psychiatrists were influenced by this method.

Read more